CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Summary & Important Questions Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Summary & Important Questions Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Summary Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

The poem “Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments” is written by William Shakespeare. It speaks about how poetry is an immortal art form that is more enduring than any material monument or statue. The poem begins with the statement that neither marble nor monuments made of gold can keep alive the memories of great people who have passed away. Instead, it is through poetry that the memories of these great people continue to live on.

The poet speaks of how poetry has the power to transcend time and space, and how it can transport the reader to a different world altogether. He goes on to say that great poets like Homer and Virgil continue to be remembered and revered even after thousands of years. The poem ends with the poet asserting that as long as there are people who appreciate the beauty and power of poetry, it will continue to be an eternal art form that will outlive even the most magnificent monuments.

In summary, “Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments” is a tribute to the enduring power of poetry as an art form that is capable of keeping alive the memories of great people and events throughout the ages.

CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Important Questions Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

  1. What does the poet mean when he says, “Not marble, nor the gilded monuments”?

The poet means that not even the most luxurious or grand monuments can truly capture the essence of the person they are meant to commemorate. These monuments may be made of the most precious materials, but they cannot match the beauty and immortality of the subject’s poetry.

  1. What is the poet’s opinion of history and the role of the poet in preserving it?

The poet believes that history can only truly be preserved through poetry. He emphasizes the importance of poetry in preserving the memory of great men and women, and he feels that poets have a responsibility to use their craft to immortalize the deeds of those who have gone before us.

  1. What is the significance of the line, “living record of your memory”?

The line signifies the poet’s belief that poetry is a living record of the memory of the great men and women of history. Poetry allows these individuals to live on through the ages and inspires future generations to greatness.

  1. What does the phrase “storied urn” refer to in the poem?

The phrase “storied urn” refers to a container that holds the ashes or remains of a great person. The urn is said to be “storied” because it holds the memories and stories of the person it commemorates.

  1. What is the message of the poem?

The message of the poem is that true greatness is not measured by monuments or material possessions, but by the immortality of one’s deeds and the legacy they leave behind. The poet suggests that only through poetry can this legacy truly be preserved and passed down through the generations.

CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Important Questions Answers Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

Who is the poet of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’?
Ans: William Shakespeare is the poet of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’.

What is the theme of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’?
Ans: The poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’ reflects upon the ephemeral nature of human achievements and the immortality of poetry.

What does the phrase ‘monuments of princes’ refer to?
Ans: The phrase ‘monuments of princes’ refers to the grand and impressive memorials that are built in the memory of the great kings and emperors.

What is the message conveyed by the phrase ‘living record of your memory’?
Ans: The phrase ‘living record of your memory’ suggests that the written word and poetry can immortalize an individual’s memory for ages to come.

What is the significance of the word ‘live’ in the line “Not marble, nor the gilded monuments/ Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme”?
Ans: The word ‘live’ suggests that the power of poetry is such that it can outlive even the most grandiose and magnificent structures built by human beings.

What is the central idea of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’?
Ans: The central idea of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’ is that human achievements, no matter how grandiose or magnificent they may be, are transitory in nature and that poetry has the power to immortalize the memory of an individual for ages to come.

What is the significance of the line “When wasteful war shall statues overturn,/ And broils root out the work of masonry”?
Ans: The line “When wasteful war shall statues overturn,/ And broils root out the work of masonry” suggests that even the most magnificent and imposing structures can be destroyed by war and violence, while poetry and written word can survive such upheavals and continue to immortalize the memory of the individuals they are written about.

What literary device is used in the line “Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn/ The living record of your memory”?
Ans: The literary device used in the line “Nor Mars his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn/ The living record of your memory” is personification, where Mars is given the attribute of a destructive force.

What is the significance of the line “And all in war with Time for love of you,/ As he takes from you, I engraft you new”?
Ans: The line “And all in war with Time for love of you,/ As he takes from you, I engraft you new” suggests that poetry and written word are in a constant struggle with the ephemeral nature of human achievements and that they can engraft and immortalize the memory of an individual for ages to come.

What is the mood of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’?
Ans: The mood of the poem ‘Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments’ is reflective and contemplative, as the poet reflects upon the transitory nature of human achievements and the immortality of poetry.

CBSE Class 10 English Literature Reader Important Questions Answers MCQs Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

The poem “Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments” is written by whom?
a) William Shakespeare
b) John Keats
c) William Wordsworth
d) Percy Bysshe Shelley
Answer: a) William Shakespeare

According to the speaker, what is the only way to truly honour someone?
a) Build a marble monument
b) Write their name in gold
c) Write a poem about them
d) Live a life that honours their memory
Answer: d) Live a life that honours their memory

What does the phrase “storied urn” refer to in the poem?
a) An ancient Greek vase
b) A monument made of marble
c) A book containing stories
d) An urn containing the ashes of the dead
Answer: d) An urn containing the ashes of the dead

What does the speaker mean when he says “The living record of your memory”?
a) People who are still alive and remember the person
b) Records and documents that mention the person
c) A person’s legacy and the impact they had on the world
d) Memories and stories that are passed down through generations
Answer: c) A person’s legacy and the impact they had on the world

In the last line of the poem, the speaker says that the person he is addressing is “living still”. What does he mean by this?
a) The person is still alive
b) The person lives on in the memories of others
c) The person’s legacy and impact are still felt
d) All of the above
Answer: d) All of the above

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Literature Reader Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments

TextBook Questions

Question 1.
Look at the following picture carefully.
NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Literature Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments Textbook Questions Q1
(a) What has Time been portrayed as? Why?
(b) What are the other symbols associated with Time?
Answer:
(a) Time has been portrayed as a mysterious man wearing a loose cloak with a scythe in one hand and an hour-glass in other. Time is shown to have been fleeting fast. Time is the greatest conqueror.
(b) Tides, bubble of water, wind, sand, money, etc.

Question 2.
(a) What are the things that last for centuries ? List a few things around you that will survive four to five hundred years into the future.

Answer:
NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Literature Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments Textbook Questions Q2.1

(b) Think of things that will perish and/or be forgotten with the passage of time.
Answer:
NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Literature Chapter 9 Not Marble, nor the Gilded Monuments Textbook Questions Q2.2

Question 3.
On the basis of your understanding of Shakespeare’s sonnet, answer the following questions by ticking the correct options.
(a) The rich and powerful got ornate monuments made in order to _____
(i) show off their wealth
(ii) display their power
(iii) show their artistic talent
(iv) be remembered till posterity.
Answer:
(iv) be remembered till posterity.

(b) The poet addresses his sonnet to _____
(i) time
(ii) war
(iii) the person he loves
(iv) powerful rulers.
Answer:
(iii) the person he loves

(c) In the line ‘The living record of your memory’, living record refers to _____
(i) the sonnet the poet has written for his friend
(ii) an existing statue of his friend
(iii) his friend who lives in the poet’s memory
(iv) the autobiography of the poet’s friend.
Answer:
(i) the sonnet the poet has written for his friend

(d) The poet’s tone in the poem is _____
(i) despairing
(ii) optimistic
(iii) loving
(iv) admiring,
Answer:
(iv) admiring,

(e) The poem is set in _____
(i) the place where the poet meets his friend
(ii) a battlefield where Mars is fighting a battle
(iii) a city ravaged by war
(iv) the poet’s study where he is writing.
Answer:
(iv) the poet’s study where he is writing.

Question 4.
Answer the following questions briefly.
(a) Why do you think the rich and powerful people get monuments and statues erected in their memory?
Answer:
Rich and powerful believe that by erecting statues and monuments people will remember them even after their death. They do not realise that people will remember them for their deeds and not for huge structures. It is their pride and ego which makes them do all this.

(b) Describe how the monuments and statues brave the ravages of time.
Answer:
Monuments and statues remade of stone and cement which are strong and structures constructed with these can stay for centuries. They can withstand extreme weather conditions such as rain, storm, severe heat, etc.

(c) Why does the poet refer to Time as being sluttish?
Answer:
Time has been referred to as ‘sluttish’ because time waits for no one. It passes by. We have to learn to value time. Time treats everyone in the same way. It does not treat a rich and poor man differently. “Sluttish” can also mean whorish as time cares for no individual; it is immoral and will finally pass. The grand memorials will become eroded, and the people memorialised will eventually be forgotten.

(d) The poet says that neither forces of nature nor wars can destroy his poetry. In fact, even godly powers of Mars will not have a devastating effect on his rhyme. What quality of the poet is revealed through these lines?
Answer:
The poet is an optimistic individual. He has immense confidence in himself as well as in his ability to write poems which will be remembered till eternity. We also see his confidence in these lines- When marble statues topple and stone buildings and other “works of masonry” are destroyed, the poetry will live on.

Question 5.
Shakespeare’s sonnet has been divided into three quatrains of 4 lines each followed by a rhyming couplet. Each quatrain is a unit of meaning. Read the poem carefully and complete the following table on the structure of the poem.

RhymeschemeTheme
Quatrain 1Comparison between poetry and monuments.
Quatrain 2Ravages of time on monuments contrasted with
Quatrain 3The recorded memorv of posteritv
CoupletPoetry immortalises friend

Answer:

Rhyme SchemeTheme
Quatrain 1a, b, ab
Quatrain 2cd cdthe living record of the memory of poet’s friend.
Quatrain 3ef efthe poet’s friend will be remembered and praised till posterity
Completgg

Question 6.
(a) The poet uses alliteration to heighten the musical quality of the sonnet. Working in pairs* underline the examples of alliteration in the poem.
(b) Identify Shakespeare’s use of personification in the poem.
Answer:
(a) Examples of alliteration

  • When wasteful war shall statues overturn
  • Not marble, nor the glided monuments
  • But you shall shine more bright in these contents.
  • Even in the eyes of all posterity
  • That wear this world out to the ending doom.

(b) Use of personification

  • When wasteful war shall statues
  • And broils root out the work of masonry.
  • Here war and broils are shown to have powerful hands that are capable of causing destruction.
  • Your praise shall still find room.

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